rsync: Needs no introduction

I don’t think there’s much I can say about rsync that isn’t already common knowledge or preaching to the choir.

kmandla@6m47421: ~/downloads$ rsync -ah --progress source/ destination/
sending incremental file list
./
sample-01.txt
            925 100%    0.00kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#1, to-chk=9/11)
sample-02.txt
            835 100%  815.43kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#2, to-chk=8/11)
sample-03.txt
            892 100%  871.09kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#3, to-chk=7/11)
sample-04.txt
            901 100%  879.88kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#4, to-chk=6/11)
sample-05.txt
            893 100%  872.07kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#5, to-chk=5/11)
sample-06.txt
            900 100%  878.91kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#6, to-chk=4/11)
sample-07.txt
            886 100%  865.23kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#7, to-chk=3/11)
sample-08.txt
            832 100%  812.50kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#8, to-chk=2/11)
sample-09.txt
            883 100%  862.30kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#9, to-chk=1/11)
sample-10.txt
            888 100%  433.59kB/s    0:00:00 (xfr#10, to-chk=0/11)

kmandla@6m47421: ~/downloads$ 

rsync is, was, and has been one of my favorite tools for a very long time, and short of single-file, one target copies, it’s the one thing I use to copy, backup, synchronize or just plain double-check.

rsync works across networks, across directories and within file trees. It gives clean progress indicators, can run completely silent, can delete files that aren’t in the source folder, and will avoid updating files that don’t exist in the destination. Just tell it what you want.

I think that will do for now. Like I said at the start, if you know it, there’s no point in me gloating over it. And if you don’t … waste no time in trying it out. 😉

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